Mark, aka Tatman 2000
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Here is the lowdown on how I did this 4 shuttle strip of tatting, inspired by Gale's mystery motif.

I used two top threads and two bottom threads (all with shuttles connected)

Let's put them in pairs and label them:The shuttles in each pair will stay together throughout the whole pattern.

There are no numbers of stitches given for any of the rings. Although the size of the split and small ring should be in proportion, the size of the rings will make your design individual and the effect can change with the number of stitches used.

Take sh2 as a core thread and start a split ring, using sh1 to make the picots as described by Gale.

Drop sh1 and pick up sh3 and do the other half of the SR but also incorporating sh4 for the picots as described by Gale.So sh3 is doing the SR work with unflipped ds and sh4 is making unflipped ds on sh3 thread. Have I lost you?! LOL!

Note: You can take this down one step and only use 3 shuttles.
sh1&2 will do the top half of the SR (making those picots of Gale's) and sh3 will make the other half of the SR.
Close the ring.


Now, we can add an extra element, a ring where a picot should be (as with SCMR).
So for one of the picots that is on top of the upper part of the SR, make it a small ring instead of a picot.
To do this you have to drop sh2 as core thread and pick up sh1 and make a separate ring.

To make the other half of the split ring look the same as the top half, make the same number of stitches, but these are unflipped. When making the small ring, drop the hand loop, pick up sh4 to make the ring, then put the hand loop back on and complete the ring with unflipped stitches.


If you want to try doing it with a visual pattern, here you go!


Enjoy!

CLICK HERE to see another daisy picot item I created.

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