Making A Ring
[home] [gallery] [patterns] [how to tat lace] [shop] [tatty links] [contact]



Click on images to get a larger view Following the directions previously covered in making the double stitch, making a ring should be a breeze! You still make the same double stitch but you hold the worker thread in your hand differently. Actually you only work with one thread to make a ring of double stitches. And with that one thread you can make endless lacy patterns. Two threads come into play when making a chain of double stitches(previously described in Figs 13-22) Take a long piece of thread and pinch the end of it. This is the same pinch as you did when there were two threads. Wrap the thread over your hand and fingers, and instead of wrapping it around your little pinky, continue on up back to the pinch. So now you will be holding the tail end of the thread, looping it and holding it again. A ring of thread will be on your hand. Refer to Fig 25 for how it will appear. Even though only one thread is being used, you still will have the working thread which goes over the hand and the core thread which goes straight out horizontally(Fig 26).



Below in Fig 27 you see the start of a ring with several double stitches. In Fig 28 there is an addition of a picot and more double stitches. The same thread that is wrapped around the hand and into the pinch and horizontally across is creating the double stitches into a ring form. A word of caution is not to make too many double stitches along the core thread at a time. It can result in your double stitches getting knotted or revert back to the unflipped position, or you may have a tendency to tat half hitches over top of double stitches. So when you get a few done, slide your pinch up to the last double stitch to keep control.



If you take your hand out of the ring thread(commonly known as the working thread), you can see how the double stitches are being connected all with one thread(Fig 29). The little tail end coming out of the first double stitch is where the pinch started. The working thread that is wrapped around your hand is making the double stitches at the same time as being the core thread.






Closing the Ring


After completing a good amount of double stitches and picots, this row of double stitches can be closed to form the ring(Fig 30). To do this, take the working thread off your hand and pinch the last double stitch made. With your other hand, firmly pull the core thread away from the ring so that slowly the ring will close. The first and last double stitches will actually meet at the end and the two tail ends of thread match up(Fig 31). To make sure the ring closes tightly, give the core thread a tug downward, toward the other tail end.



Make A Comment


Disclaimer: The opinions expressed on these pages are solely of the author
and are not to be taken as gospel. There are several ways to accomplish
each step of the processes and it is up to your discretion to find what best
suits your situation.